Neuromancer

, #1

Paperback, 276 pages

English language

Published Aug. 25, 2000 by Ace Books.

ISBN:
978-0-441-00746-2
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4 stars (18 reviews)

The Matrix is a world within the world, a global consensus- hallucination, the representation of every byte of data in cyberspace . . .

Case had been the sharpest data-thief in the business, until vengeful former employers crippled his nervous system. But now a new and very mysterious employer recruits him for a last-chance run. The target: an unthinkably powerful artificial intelligence orbiting Earth in service of the sinister Tessier-Ashpool business clan. With a dead man riding shotgun and Molly, mirror-eyed street-samurai, to watch his back, Case embarks on an adventure that ups the ante on an entire genre of fiction.

Hotwired to the leading edges of art and technology, Neuromancer ranks with 1984 and Brave New World as one of the century's most potent visions of the future.

62 editions

Fascinante

4 stars

[ESP] Es fácil darse cuenta de por qué es tan influyente, aunque ha quedado comprensiblemente anticuado en algunas cosas, como hace notar Gibson en el prólogo.

El libro es más o menos complicado de leer, pero tiene varios pasajes ciertamente fascinantes, en los que se describe el mundo altamente computerizado que se contruye

[ENG] It's easy to grasp why this book is so important, even though in certain aspects it's understandably outdated, as Gibson himself notes in the prologue.

The book is somewhat difficult to follow, but has some fascinating parts in how well he describes the electronics heavy world he built

Fascinante

4 stars

[ESP] Es fácil darse cuenta de por qué es tan influyente, aunque ha quedado comprensiblemente anticuado en algunas cosas, como hace notar Gibson en el prólogo.

El libro es más o menos complicado de leer, pero tiene varios pasajes ciertamente fascinantes, en los que se describe el mundo altamente computerizado que se contruye

[ENG] It's easy to grasp why this book is so important, even though in certain aspects it's understandably outdated, as Gibson himself notes in the prologue.

The book is somewhat difficult to follow, but has some fascinating parts in how well he describes the electronics heavy world he built

Debe leerse con gran disposición

3 stars

Uno de los libros que me ha resultado más difícil de comentar/calificar... Por un lado, me parece admirable la forma en que Gibson se adelanta a su tiempo de maneras que muy pocos se atrevieron y muchos menos consiguieron convertir casi en "profecías". Por otro lado, la narrativa es difícil de seguir... No por compleja, quizás es un asunto de gusto personal o del momento de mi vida en que lo leí, pero me costó conectar emocionalmente con los personajes. Me lo apunto como un libro al que le debo una segunda lectura, con una disposición diferente de mi parte.

Prophecy in cyberspace

No rating

Reading this book is like undoing what has happened in the last few years. The word cyberspace did not even exist before Gibson invented it. And we still haven't seen all of it yet. It's not just a matter of technology, it's a matter of the expansion of consciousness and the expansion of consciousness beyond the boundaries of the human being. Not necessarily a good thing. When you read this novel, I think it allows you to get into the idea and to start to think about the world and about technology in a different way.

reviewed Neuromancer by William Gibson

Desert Island Pulp Sci-fi

5 stars

Anyone wanting to argue than Neuromancer has aged like either milk or wine will readily find all the examples they could want to make their case; but the depiction of the consensual hallucination in Neuromancer still reads like a more futuristic network and virtual reality technology than anything we have today.

The words visionary and iconic get thrown around by hypebeasts and idiots to the point they're a debased and inflated currency, but describing Neuromancer without them is telling lies of omission. Parts of Neuromancer still describe a vision of what may yet come (and a far from idealised vision at that).

For anyone who hasn't read it, expect it to make less sense on your first reading than the second. Some things seem overly detailed but on rereading the same ink on the same pages somehow has written different words leaving me a completely different impression second time around. …

reviewed Neuromancer by William Gibson (Sprawl Trilogy, #1)

More about the ideas than anything else

3 stars

It took a long time to read because it’s so dense and a little abstract the whole way through. Some noir plots in the beginning with an action movie ending, which is all well and good, but the characters don’t have much depth to them.

It’s a absolutely an important piece of sci-fi pop culture but as a novel it’s not memorable for me.

Review of 'Neuromancer (Remembering Tomorrow)' on 'Storygraph'

4 stars

I thought I'd read this before, but remember nothing. Which is surprising, because it was really freak'n cool. From the very first line, it's all so dang evocative. I had to re-read so much of it to savour each description. But also had to re-read a lot because I only read a page or two at a time, and I got lost a lot returning to it, because everything moved so fast. But hot dang, I see why it's a classic.

Review of 'Neuromancer' on 'Goodreads'

5 stars

This book is truly a classic that I read in the 80's it has stood the test of time. It has only has gotten better as the layers of nostalgia that Gibson layered into the original read one way in the late 80's now read with an additional patina of nostalgia that makes them even sensuous, luxurious, and grotesque yet still with a word; Greater.

“Things aren't different. Things are things.”

“When the past is always with you, it may as well be present; and if it is present, it will be future as well.”

“The Matrix has its roots in primitive arcade games,' said the voice-over, 'in early graphics programs and military experimentation with cranial jacks.' On the Sony, a two-dimensional space war faded behind a forest of mathematically generated ferns, demonstrating the spatial possibilities of logarithmic spirals; cold blue military footage burned through, lab animals wired into test …

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Subjects

  • Computer hackers -- Fiction
  • Business intelligence -- Fiction
  • Information superhighway -- Fiction
  • Nervous system -- Wounds and injuries -- Fiction
  • Conspiracies -- Fiction
  • Japan -- Fiction

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