User Profile

djwfyi

djwfyi@books.theunseen.city

Joined 1 year, 8 months ago

I'm a software tech writer by day. I enjoy reading sci-fi and fantasy, science, some philosophy, and anything else that looks interesting or challenging. Professionally, I need to learn a great deal about cloud native tech like Kubernetes, storage, AWS, and so on.

This link opens in a pop-up window

djwfyi's books

To Read (View all 7)

Currently Reading

Brooks, Arthur C.: Love Your Enemies (2019, HarperCollins Publishers) 5 stars

In chapter 1, it is practice gratitude rather than contempt. In chapter 2, it is act nice to others, even we you don't feel like it. While action follows feelings, feelings also follow actions. So feed in good actions and good feelings result.

I think both of these suggestions have great merit for regular life and are very much worth putting into practice, hard as they are.

Brooks, Arthur C.: Love Your Enemies (2019, HarperCollins Publishers) 5 stars

  1. Focus on other people's distress, and focus on it empathetically. ...
  2. ... Make sure you offer five positive comments for every criticism. On social media, that means five positive messages for every one others might see as negative.
  3. No contempt is ever justified, even if, in the heat of the moment, you think someone deserves it. It is unjustified more often than you know, it is always bad for you, and it will never convince anyone that she is wrong.
  4. Go where people disagree with you and learn from them. ...

Love Your Enemies by  (16%)

Recounting suggestions from Dr. John Gottman on actions we can take personally in an effort to bring more unity back to public discourse.

Telaina Eriksen: Unconditional (2017, Mango Media) No rating

Parents of LGBT children guide: Unconditional: A Guide to Loving and Supporting Your LGBTQ Child" …

A good introduction for someone entering the world of LGBTQ+ life through their child. Each chapter ends with first hand perspectives of others and a helpful list of resources related to the chapter's topic.

Dianna E. Anderson, Emily Vanderwerff: In Transit (2022, 1517 Media) 5 stars

For decades, our cultural discourse around trans and gender-diverse people has been viewed through a …

I'll have to come back and reread this. It's a powerful history lesson and memoir that highlights the beauty and difficulty of just being when your being doesn't fit the socially accepted norms.

Highly recommended.

Dianna E. Anderson, Emily Vanderwerff: In Transit (2022, 1517 Media) 5 stars

For decades, our cultural discourse around trans and gender-diverse people has been viewed through a …

This is one of the reasons representation of differently gendered or ungendered bodies is so deeply important: seeing ourselves reflected in the public not only gives us courage to be who we are, but it also asserts for us that it is right and normal and OK for us to feel joy. And it's OK for us to want that, to want to live a life free and open and joyous.

In Transit by , (Page 98)

It's okay for every human to live. To be joyful. How devastating that we deprive so many of the belief and right to such.

Gardner Landry: Merlin of the Magnolias (Hardcover, 2021, Greenleaf Book Group, Greenleaf Book Group Press) No rating

I just can't with this book. The vocabulary is unnecessarily pretentious. The big words are there for the sake of there being big words to show off that the author can use them. They don't serve the story at all. They just get in the way. The fat shaming is grotesque (there was a whole chapter that went into great depths to talk about the main characters eating habits and food choices, and the author doesn't miss a chance to remind people how obese he wrote the character). There have been lewd scenes and innuendos that seem to exist simply because the author wanted to show that he could put them in the book. It's all just so ... unnecessary.

Setting aside, and won't be coming back to it.