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Henry

henry@books.theunseen.city

Joined 11 months, 3 weeks ago

Runner, artist, musician, book nerd & privacy advocate. Owner of Techlore & co-host of Surveillance Report.

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2023 Reading Goal

20% complete! Henry has read 5 of 24 books.

Move Your DNA (Paperback, 2017, Propriometrics Press) No rating

"In Move Your DNA, biomechanist Katy Bowman explains our deep need for movement - right …

it is often our skin weakness that prevents us from recruiting our muscles in a natural, synergistic fashion. Toughen up your feet by walking on terrain that yields to your foot in different ways. The callus that will develop from walking barefoot outside will have the best circulation and the most cellular activity of any part of the foot.

Move Your DNA by  (Page 109)

I’ve never directly considered the role skin has on our ability to use our muscles as they should be - though it’s obvious!

The main reason we don’t walk barefoot is due to it hurting our feet, which is completely a skin problem pushing us towards unnatural footwear. There is a relationship between movement and skin that’s very nifty!

Move Your DNA (Paperback, 2017, Propriometrics Press) No rating

"In Move Your DNA, biomechanist Katy Bowman explains our deep need for movement - right …

Extreme soreness has become a celebrated experience in our culture, but pain is often an indication that you've gone too far, too fast.

Move Your DNA by  (Page 87)

Love it!! I cringe when people use how sore they are as a measurement of the success of their workout. All this speaks to is how past your level of comfort you pushed in one day, which anyone can do.

You know what’s really impressive? Consistently exercising every day at a sustainable rate with self control so you aren’t stuck on the couch for 2 days after a workout.

Move Your DNA (Paperback, 2017, Propriometrics Press) No rating

"In Move Your DNA, biomechanist Katy Bowman explains our deep need for movement - right …

In the same way supplements should not be the bulk of your diet, exercise should not be the bulk of your movement profile.

Move Your DNA by  (Page 85)

I wish the author used more formal units/measurement to help us define what a “profile” is. She refers a lot to walking mileage, so is this mileage dependent? Because if it is and I run 12 miles a day, does that mean I need to walk 20+ miles that day to ensure exercise isn’t the bulk of my movement? Or is it time-based? Or is it simply variety-based?

I would’ve loved to see a deeper dive into what constitutes a quality movement profile in relation to daily exercise, though it doesn’t seem this book is actually written for athletes like myself (more on this in the book review)

Move Your DNA (Paperback, 2017, Propriometrics Press) No rating

"In Move Your DNA, biomechanist Katy Bowman explains our deep need for movement - right …

I've heard disease like an osteoarthritic knee, for example casually explained away with statements like "your knee just got old and wore out." Why, then (in this case), is the other knee fine? Aren't they the same age, after all?

Move Your DNA by  (Page 72)

Love this. While incredibly simplified, it does speak to the oddness of when people have “a bad knee” and attribute it to something like age/wear - when the other knee is perfectly fine. This at least tells us there are individual factors (likely related to lifestyle) that are disproportionately impacting a specific side of your body.

Move Your DNA (Paperback, 2017, Propriometrics Press) No rating

"In Move Your DNA, biomechanist Katy Bowman explains our deep need for movement - right …

And in fact, recently, researchers have discovered that sitting time itself is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, even in those who exercise regularly. Regular bouts of exercise do not undo the effect that sitting has on the body. As you can imagine, this was reported widely under headlines like "Sitting Is the New Smoking." Iknow, it seems like "sitting" is referring to that position you adopt in a chair or a couch, but consider this: If I told you that sitting kills, then you'd swap standing for sitting, naturally thinking you'd avoided the problem. But if you just stand there in your office for fifteen years, then you'll likely end up with issues equal in quantity to those of the guy who sat all day. Let us not forget that the collective move of workers to chairs stemmed from the standing injuries created by post-industrial standing-all-day factory work. "Standing" already has its risk of injury on file. The move from your work chair to a standing workstation is like that joke,' "I read that all accidents happened within fifteen miles of one's house, so I moved." "I read that sitting kills, so now I'm afraid to stop standing." For load reasons, the transition from a chair to a standing workstation is a step in the right direction, but standing the bulk of the day is a different version of the same problem. The position of sitting isn't problematic, it's the repetitive use of a single position that makes us ill.

Move Your DNA by  (Page 71)

Move Your DNA (Paperback, 2017, Propriometrics Press) No rating

"In Move Your DNA, biomechanist Katy Bowman explains our deep need for movement - right …

Exercisers represent the movers in our culture, but exercisers themselves are sedentary most of the day when compared to hunter-gathering populations. The difference between a non-exerciser and someone who works out regularly is about three hundred minutes a week. For those who have ever started an exercise program, those extra three hundred minutes can be tricky to commit to, but when you do, you feel so much better. Imagine the difference between the average exerciser (moving about three hundred minutes a week) and the hunter-gatherer, who used his or her body eight hours a day (approximately three thousand minutes a week), and still took more time to rest than you do. The frequency the hunter-gatherer moved is tenfold to our movement frequency. The difference between three hundred and three thousand minutes of weekly loading is tremendous for all of our tissues.

Move Your DNA by  (Page 66)

Move Your DNA (Paperback, 2017, Propriometrics Press) No rating

"In Move Your DNA, biomechanist Katy Bowman explains our deep need for movement - right …

As you read more of this book, it will help to remember that exercise is movement, but movement is not always exercise.

Move Your DNA by  (Page 65)

To put it simply, Katy isn’t necessarily arguing against exercise, she’s just arguing that exercise is one of many parts of movement - yet we treat exercise as our only movement in modern-day society.

Move Your DNA (Paperback, 2017, Propriometrics Press) No rating

"In Move Your DNA, biomechanist Katy Bowman explains our deep need for movement - right …

For example, if you're a kick-ass runner and you run all the time and you run easily and without pain, your body is probably very adapted to the tissue strengths necessary to run. But say you help a friend move and, in lifting a few boxes, you are thrown out of commission for a month with a major back spasm. Weren't you strong? Weren't you in shape? Weren't you a regular mover, and doesn't that mean you were conditioned to move? The answer to all of these questions has to do with the Law of Specificity, which dictates that you get better at what you do and not better at what you don't. A particular way of moving creates loads and adaptations in only the tissues pulled and pushed and compressed by that activity.

Move Your DNA by  (Page 60)

It’s funny to see the law of specificity used as a negative to running. Context, as a runner (and coach) we love the law of specificity. “To be a good runner you need to run” is a common phrase.

But in a book about general health, this specific nature of well-trained runners can work against general health. As demonstrated by the infamous weak hips and glutes of runners, since running does little to properly work these areas - requiring us to do additional exercises to target what running neglects (lower leg work, hip work, glutes, core, etc.)

Move Your DNA (Paperback, 2017, Propriometrics Press) No rating

"In Move Your DNA, biomechanist Katy Bowman explains our deep need for movement - right …

A gene is a specific sequence of DNA on a single chromosome that encodes a particular product. Many people associate genes with the concept of pre-determination, and will use these terms interchangeably, as in, "The doctor said my bad knees were genetic," or, "Research shows that cardiovascular disease is genetic." But using the term genetic in this way is at best outdated and at worst totally paralyzing to the person with the issue. It would be more accurate to think about genes as "range-setters" of an outcome. Your genetic constitution is not a picture of how you are going to look now and in the future. Rather, your genetic makeup is like one of those disks you put in a View-Master-a plethora of potential outcomes for you to select by toggling on the View-Master's lever.

Move Your DNA by  (Page 38)

Holy moly I am SO happy this is addressed. I hear so many things from people (especially through my coaching) that revolve around “it runs in my family” or “it’s genetic” when they haven’t even attempted any solution to make the problem better. If your genetics predispose you to “bad arches in your feet” (which I doubt their doctor did a formal lab test to confirm this is actually genetic) - then why do you think sticking yourself in an orthotic to further enable the weakness of your arches is doing anything to address the problem? Perhaps the reason why your arch is weak is partially (if not mostly) due to lifestyle decisions. Even if it’s not caused by lifestyle decisions, lifestyle decisions can IMPROVE the problem, whereas the orthotic just removes the pain without removing the problem.

Just to outline, there ARE situations where genetics can have very real …

Move Your DNA (Paperback, 2017, Propriometrics Press) No rating

"In Move Your DNA, biomechanist Katy Bowman explains our deep need for movement - right …

"But wait," you say. "I do exercise, so what about me?" The prevailing understanding of exercise includes the belief that exercise of any type improves the distribution of oxygen to all tissues, but this is not the case. Movement of any type improves the circulation (read: oxygen and waste removal) only through the muscles that are being used for that specific movement. Even if you're a great exerciser- -maybe you bike or jog religiously only the muscles you've used for that specific exercise garner any benefits. Over time, heavy use of your body in one particular pattern makes strong tissues next to weaker ones, which creates an environment where an injury can slowly develop. The frequent consumption of varied movement is what drives essential physiological processes. Movement is not as optional as we have led ourselves to believe. Just as a lack of food (or, heaven forbid, oxygen) leads to a multitude of biological signals and physiological outcomes, people are living in their body-houses surrounded by screaming alarms in the form of pain, illness, and disease, and they are unaware of the source of the problem. You have been doing the movement equivalent of under-eating and under-breathing, which is having an impact on your whole body, right down to the cellular level.

Move Your DNA by  (Page 32)

Before I started reading this book, I had a hunch that despite all the running and exercise I was doing, the sedentary life outside my bouts of exercise weren’t doing me any favors. To be specifically called out here is a big eye-opener.

Move Your DNA (Paperback, 2017, Propriometrics Press) No rating

"In Move Your DNA, biomechanist Katy Bowman explains our deep need for movement - right …

We slouch into our furniture, and let our shoes support our feet. Yes, our modern culture of convenience appeals to our human instinct to conserve energy, but we are not imprisoned in any real physical way. And because we are not being forced into the office, the designer footwear, or the supercomfy couch, I suggest here that we replace affluent ailments with diseases of behavior.

Move Your DNA by  (Page 14)