A Prayer for the Crown-Shy

Monk & Robot #2

Hardcover, 160 pages

English language

Published July 11, 2022 by Doherty Associates, LLC, Tom.

ISBN:
978-1-250-23623-4
Copied ISBN!
OCLC Number:
1300756362

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5 stars (24 reviews)

After touring the rural areas of Panga, Sibling Dex (a Tea Monk of some renown) and Mosscap (a robot sent on a quest to determine what humanity really needs) turn their attention to the villages and cities of the little moon they call home.

They hope to find the answers they seek, while making new friends, learning new concepts, and experiencing the entropic nature of the universe.

Becky Chambers's new series continues to ask: in a world where people have what they want, does having more even matter?

6 editions

yes and more

5 stars

i liked how the storytelling shifted and adapted with the story change that we have between the two groups. the discovery of the different human settlements and their societies is fascinating, thought-provoking and poetic all at once. i loved the ending, even if i had to read it multiple times to be sure. i will miss Dex and Mosscap. :(((

The road trip continues

4 stars

I started this right after I finished the first one. It deals with Mosscap's tour of Panga to learn what humans need. It gets a lot of different answers. We get to experience the different areas of the world and the different ways people choose to live there in a sustainable fashion. No spoilers but Mosscap is presented with an ineresting philosophical question and it turns out Dex still hasn't really found what they're looking for. The ending is quite open and I'm looking forward to find out where the two are heading next.

Beautiful book. I am amazed at Becky Chamber's magic abilities.

5 stars

Content warning General spoilers

Quick, gentle, sensorially rich read

4 stars

Content warning Oblique reference to ending

A Prayer for the Crown-Shy

5 stars

Content warning minor spoilers

do the behaviors

4 stars

These are definitely allegories (think Ishmael by Daniel Quinn; Jonathan Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach), and as such you can see the strings in places. Something in me still sings at the sense of recognition; the struggle of feeling messier than one ought to be, of wanting to fill the world with activity and the diminishing returns that provides, of it being easier sometimes to be vulnerable with people who don't know you very well at all.

Searching for meaning in the spaces between us

5 stars

What does it mean to be, to exist? How do we find satisfaction in simply being? Or does satisfaction come from contributing something back to others while having our own needs met by them? What do we need as people? As individuals? As a society? As a shared planet?

Chambers explores big questions, maybe even bigger ones in our second journey with Dex and Mosscap as when we first met them.

I left the first book wanting a friend to serve me tea. In leaving this one wanting to give and to be given to. For in that is life and meaning and contentment. Thriving and leaving space for others around me to thrive, too.

Five stars.

Like a soothing cup of tea

5 stars

Another sweet and generous tale, so full of heart and the doubts that can fill one. I found myself moved to think about the world differently and literally reconsidered my career choices at one point while reading. The way the author teases out ideas about identity and self-perception really landed for me.

On a less positive note, this book got me trouble when I laughed out loud in bed and woke up my wife who had just nodded off. Thanks Becky!

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