All Systems Red

(The Murderbot Diaries #1)

eBook, 156 pages

English language

Published Dec. 13, 2017 by Tor.com.

View on OpenLibrary

4 stars (36 reviews)

"As a heartless killing machine, I was a complete failure."

In a corporate-dominated spacefaring future, planetary missions must be approved and supplied by the Company. Exploratory teams are accompanied by Company-supplied security androids, for their own safety.

But in a society where contracts are awarded to the lowest bidder, safety isn’t a primary concern.

On a distant planet, a team of scientists are conducting surface tests, shadowed by their Company-supplied ‘droid — a self-aware SecUnit that has hacked its own governor module, and refers to itself (though never out loud) as “Murderbot.” Scornful of humans, all it really wants is to be left alone long enough to figure out who it is.

But when a neighboring mission goes dark, it's up to the scientists and their Murderbot to get to the truth.

4 editions

Review of 'All Systems Red' on 'Goodreads'

5 stars

I LOVED All Systems Red. Murderbot might be my new favorite character in all of Sci-Fi. I had to read this for my first grad school class at Emerson, and it was an overall winner. Highly recommended if you like Sci-Fi, or if you like character-driven stories that are quick-paced, with decent action and good suspense. I will most definitely be adding the other Murderbot books to my TBR pile.

I do not remember how I feel about this

3 stars

I read this a couple weeks ago and could tell you approximately nothing about the plot! I remember having a nice time reading it? It's short, which is to its credit. There is some stuff about untrustworthy corporations, and the main character is a robot whose robot-ness seems to be a metaphor for neurodivergence of some kind? I don't know. It never really came together but also, hey, it was short.

Review of 'All Systems Red' on 'Goodreads'

3 stars

This was a quick read, and I spent most of it struggling to decide how I felt about a narrator that sounds so HUMAN, yet seemed so disinterested in the notion of being owned -- that is, until I realized that hacking the governor and avoiding humans was very much an act of autonomy, and that much of the struggle for Murderbot isn't "Do I want to be free?", it's "What kind of 'free' could I attain, and which of my options is least repulsive?", at least at the end.

All in all, not bad, but I didn't really find myself caring about the characters or their fates, and that was a big detractor.

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